When Should You Move Puppy Crate Out of Bedroom?

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When to Move Puppy Crate Out of Bedroom

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Like newborns, puppies don’t come with manuals. Pet parents are often left with the option of trial and error until they get the hang of things.

Take the issue of crate training for instance; how do you know what works and what doesn’t? Everyone has their own way of going through the all-important process of pet ownership.

Ideally, most owners have their puppies’ crates in their bedrooms for obvious reasons.

For the first few weeks in a new home, a puppy feels lost, confused, and terrified. He has just been disconnected from his actual family. He can neither see his mom nor his siblings.

Placing his crate in the bedroom somehow assures him that he’s not alone. He can hear you breathing which makes him feel a little more secure.

In a bid to keep your fur baby comfortable and happy, you might extend his stay in the bedroom for far too long. When it’s time to get them out, it becomes a massive struggle.

On the other hand, some pet parents fear the hassle of moving the puppy out of the bedroom that they end up doing it too soon.

So, when is the right time to move the tiny dog out of your bedroom?

After A Week or Two

There are different schools of thought when it comes to the whole crate training topic.

A number of dog experts recommend placing the crate in the bedroom for the first week or so.

The first day you bring the puppy home, it is in your best interest to put her in a crate. The crate is tiny and comfortable giving her the assurance of protection.

If you use a kennel or any other spacious sleeping solution, she might feel all alone in the vast space.

During the first few days, place the crate as near to you as possible. If you have a chair beside the bed, place the crate on top of it.

This way, you can both hear each other breathing and enjoy better sleep. You can also hear him if he’s in distress or if he needs to use the potty.

After a few days of calmness, consider moving him further away from your bed.

Towards the end of the week, he should be okay sleeping somewhere in the corner of the room.

As his independence develops, you can safely transition him to a different room.

Start with the room next to the bedroom then finally place the crate in his designated space.

If you notice any resistance and distress, regroup and slow down lest you lose attachment with them completely.

When He’s Ready

The second school of thought is to move the crate when the puppy is actually ready.

There are no timelines here. You just have to follow your gut and your dog’s behavior to tell when it needs to happen.

It could be a few days, one month, or one year.

To get this right, you have to watch your baby closely. Look for cues of dependency. Keep moving the crate every couple of days and see what happens.

First, move the crate away from the bed to the corner of the bedroom then to the bedroom door. Keep the door open and be attentive at night.

If you encounter minimal or zero drama (no barking, restlessness, anxiety, and nervousness), move him even further away. Give it a few days before you judge the situation.

Proceed to the next room, then the stairs then the final dog room.

If at any point, he has trouble sleeping at night, go back to the last spot and start the training process again. This may take months or weeks depending on your commitment, your pup’s transition, and a few other factors.

Once you are comfortable your pup is happy in the new location, you have gained a massive victory.

When to When to Move Puppy Crate Out of Bedroom: Final Thoughts

When should you move your puppy crate out of the bedroom?

You can either go by the recommended 1-2 week period or break all rules and choose your preferred time.

The bottom line is that you should only make the transition if your fur baby is comfortable.

You don’t need a degree in dog ownership to tell if your puppy is happy or not.

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Sable M. is a canine chef, professional pet blogger, and proud owner of two male dogs. I have been an animal lover all my life, with dogs holding a special place in my heart. Initially, I created this blog to share recipes, tips, and any relevant information on healthy homemade dog treats. But because of my unrelenting passion to make a difference in the world of dogs, I have expanded the blog’s scope to include the best information and recommendations about everything dog lovers need to know about their canine friends’ health and wellbeing. My mission now is to find the most helpful content on anything related to dogs and share it with fellow hardworking hound lovers. While everything I share is in line with the latest evidence-based veterinarian health guidelines, nothing should be construed as veterinary advice. Please contact your vet in all matters regarding your Fido’s health.