Top 15 Mouthy Dog Breeds

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Mouthy Dog Breeds

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Does your dog use his mouth a little more than he should? Perhaps he constantly grabs your pants as you walk around the house, bites his leash repeatedly, or loves to deliver soft painless bites all the time. These are signs of mouthiness—a behavior that is quite common among some dog breeds. Essentially, mouthy dogs communicate feelings of stress and frustration through the behavior. Other times, they are trying to learn dog-human interaction. Follow through as we explore 15 mouthy dog breeds.

1. Golden Retriever

The Golden retriever is hands down the number one breed when it comes to being mouthy. For many breeds out there, nipping, biting, and licking often ceases after the puppy stage. However, for a Golden retriever, the behavior is highly likely to go on into adulthood. Part of the reason for this is that this breed was bred to “retrieve” small game without hurting or killing them. Doing this taught him to explore his world with his mouth. Thankfully, proper training can alleviate the behavior once and for all. This popular dog has stolen the hearts of many with his intelligence and gentleness. He makes for a great family pet especially if you have kids.

2. Flat-Coated Retriever

The flat-coated retriever is also naturally mouthy. He can chew on anything just to feel good. If there are no chew toys in sight, expect him to take on your shoes, clothes, and furniture. He is also an energetic dog that loves to jump on people. Find a way to train them as early as you can otherwise you will end up with a mouthy dog forever.

3. Labrador Retriever

Yes, all the retrievers carry their mouthy behavior to adulthood. Labs are no exception. If you have one at home, don’t be alarmed if he nips, licks, and bites more than he should. He was also developed to retrieve game back in the day. Trust him to carry anything in his mouth gently without breaking or damaging it. Just be prepared with plenty of chew toys for when he engages you in a biting game.

4. Beagle

A Beagle is a smart, playful, curious, and affectionate dog. His size and gentle nature make him good with young kids. However, underneath those cute puppy eyes and a smart brain lies a tendency to mouth. This behavior can drive you nuts, especially during the puppy age but if you train him well, he will grow out of it.

5. Pyrenean Shepherd

This muscular, incredibly fast, and gracious dog breed is also a victim of being too mouthy. Also known for his amazing work ethic, the Pyrenean Shepherd enjoys playing with different things in his mouth. He is always ready to play a game of fetch, chew on your brand new leather shoe till the morning sun, and nip on stuff at home. Again, all you have to do is to train him to know what qualifies as a chew toy and what doesn’t.

6. American Pit Bull Terrier

Dog Breeds that Get Along with Pit Bulls

A pit bull is one of the most aggressive dogs out there. He loves to fight with other dogs and human beings if need be. If you have one at home, expect him to nip and bite like his life depends on it. As a puppy, this behavior is less serious. However, as he matures, the nipping can be quite painful, thanks to his strong jaws. It is, therefore, necessary to train your terrier to tame his behavior. He can be stubborn but if you establish dominion earlier on, you will be just fine.

7. Staffordshire-Bull-Terrier

The Staffordshire-bull-terrier or Staffy is a short, agile, and intelligent dog in the terrier family. In addition to being courageous, this breed is also great around children. The only downside is that he can be mouthy. The behavior is more pronounced in puppyhood but don’t be surprised if an adult Staffy nips and bites your hand, clothes, and everything else in the house. Lucky for you, he makes up for this behavior through his loyalty, charm, and cuteness.

8. Basenji

A basenji may be quiet and clean but he also has the potential to be mouthy. Sometimes, he believes the whole world is a game. When you get up from the sofa, he loves to grab your pants or lick your toes. When you try to put the leash around him, he might bite your hands or the leash. If you try and stop him, he is likely to become fierce. As usual, your best bet at controlling the behavior is proper and consistent training.

9. Irish Wolfhound

Tall, thick-haired, and active, an Irish wolfhound is a wonderful addition to any family. If you have the amount of space this breed needs to jump around and basically live in, he will add lots of joy to your life. However, watch out for mouthy behavior in all stages of his life. Granted, not all Irish Wolfhounds nip and pick round the clock but when you see yours exhibiting the behavior, don’t panic. Rather, teach him how to control it.

10. Bernese Mountain Dog

The next dog breed with a potential to be mouthy is the cute and cuddly Bernese mountain dog. During the puppy stage, he won’t stop putting things in his mouth. Even when lying on your lap, a Bernie always wants to nip and bite any body part he can get his mouth on. As he grows older, the behavior will fizzle out a little except for a few who carry it on to adulthood. Most pet owners give their Bernies a little time out in their crates when the behavior gets out of hand. You might want to try the same trick.

11. German Shepherd

Biting and nipping are also common among German shepherds. Like in other breeds, the behavior is a desperate cry of attention, exploration, and the kind of training offered (or not offered). Lucky for you, this dog is highly intelligent and easy to train. Focus more on positive reinforcement and rewards for the best results.

12. Chow-chow

This adorable ball of fur is known for his unique fluffy coat, loyalty, and fierce protection. He may be cuddly and cute but he can intimidate people and other dogs just by how he looks. This dog is also prone to mouthiness, especially during teething. Some chow-chow adults also tend to bite and nip more than they should.

13. Poodle

Like the chow-chow, the poodle is an exceptional dog, both for his beauty and smarts. Unfortunately, he can use his mouth in unpleasant ways like licking too much and nipping. Although rare, a poodle can deliver a bite that punches the skin. It’s a behavior that requires thorough training to control.

14. Greyhound

Here’s another dog breed that loves to lick and nip all day long. Sometimes he doesn’t really bite but wants to close his mouth with your hand or toe in it. A little of this behavior is welcome but when he wants to do it on repeat, it can easily get annoying. If you’ve noticed the behavior, get an experienced trainer pronto.

15. Shiba Inu

Shiba Inus have that foxy face that is absolutely stunning. On the other hand, he can be quite mouthy. One of his favorite things to do during his free time is to bite your hands, poke holes in your curtains, bite the leash, hump your leg, pounce on you, and run around the house like crazy. Only intense training can save you (and your house) from the madness.

Final Thoughts

Mouthy dogs aren’t really dangerous—they are just annoying. The constant biting, nipping, pulling your clothes damaging your beloved items at home, and endless licking can drive you up the wall. The secret? Get your dog trained by an expert.

 

 

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Sable M. is a canine chef, professional pet blogger, and proud owner of two male dogs. I have been an animal lover all my life, with dogs holding a special place in my heart. Initially, I created this blog to share recipes, tips, and any relevant information on healthy homemade dog treats. But because of my unrelenting passion to make a difference in the world of dogs, I have expanded the blog’s scope to include the best information and recommendations about everything dog lovers need to know about their canine friends’ health and wellbeing. My mission now is to find the most helpful content on anything related to dogs and share it with fellow hardworking hound lovers. While everything I share is in line with the latest evidence-based veterinarian health guidelines, nothing should be construed as veterinary advice. Please contact your vet in all matters regarding your Fido’s health.