How Much Does American Eskimo Dog Cost?

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American Eskimo dog price

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Like every dog in the Spitz family, the American Eskimo, or ‘Eskie’ is a very attractive dog. With a white dense coat and beautiful black eyes, this breed looks like royalty. As a matter of fact, she was the choice for Queen Charlotte and other English nobles over the years. So, yeah, this one is a royal dog. Her beauty radiates in the entire room. She has a spring in her step that makes her the more endearing. If you are planning to get one, prepare to be smitten with incredible beauty, affection, and loyalty.

Whether you are adopting or buying an Eskie, you will have to part with some cash. Knowing how much you will use to get one will help you adequately prepare. To make your work easier, we have compiled a quick guide on the American Eskimo dog price.

American Eskimo Dog Price

Buying Cost

The Eskie is not a very popular dog in the United States. However, it is coming up quite fast. As a result, a healthy puppy from a good breeder will set you back anywhere between $600 and $800.

As usual, the price is primarily determined by breeding. Mixed-breeds fetch lower prices in the market than purebred ones. Other things like training, socialization, pedigree, age, and the choice of breeder also impact the final price. For a top-quality pet, you can pay up to $2,500.

For that cost, you will get a healthy dog that is up to date with all her vaccinations. She should have gone through all the vet tests with evidence of the same on paper. Because breeders spend a ton to do these tests, the puppy price will go up.  You can only buy such a puppy from a reputable breeder—hopefully one that is recognized by the AKC and other kennel clubs. If you choose to work with unscrupulous businessmen, you risk ending up with a puppy with poor health.

If you are low in cash, you are better off adopting an American Eskimo puppy. This will cost you about $150-$300. The price goes up if you go for younger puppies than if you adopted slightly older or adult dogs. This is because most people prefer very young puppies over the older ones since the former are easier to train than the latter.

Other Upfront Costs

Once you’ve factored in the American Eskimo price, you need to keep in mind that there are other initial costs to keep in mind. These include the following:

  • Registration Costs: This is optional but if you want to enroll your dog to the AKC or any other kennel club, you might want to register him after purchase. Being a member of the AKC is beneficial as it gives you an idea of your pup’s ancestry. Your pup also gets additional services such as medical covers of up to $1,500 per year. Plus, the 24/7 protection and custom collar tag give you peace of mind that your pup is always safe. AKC offers a number of different packages. Choose one depending on your financial muscle.
  • Transportation Costs: If you are traveling by land, consider using a crate located at the back seat of your car. You can also let him sit with you but that can be risky as some canines can be rather unpredictable. When using air transport, the stakes are higher. You will need a transport crate, your puppy’s vaccination certificate, and of course, a ticket. These things don’t come cheap. The cost is inexistent if you are buying your puppy from your local or nearby breeder.

Recurring Costs

As soon as your fur baby lands, you will realize that she needs a lot of stuff to survive and thrive. These include grooming tools, dog beds, bedding, food, toys, and more. The actual cost will depend on the brand, comfort, luxury, seller, and location. Do your own research to know unbeatable prices for quality stuff.

Health maintenance can be a very costly affair as well. American Eskimos are predisposed to certain diseases such as progressive retinal atrophy, hip dysplasia, juvenile cataracts, and Legg-Perthes disease. If you are unlucky to get your puppy from a non-reputable breeder, you may never know the health of your puppy. Over the course of his life, you will end up spending thousands of dollars treating the puppy.

Essentially, you want to ensure that your Eskie gets all the vaccinations including Distemper, DHLPP, Parvo, Leptospirosis, Hepatitis, and Parainfluenza within the first year. These can cost $75 – $100 depending on the facility.

In addition, taking your American Eskimo through intense training is a mandatory process if you want her to have good manners. Besides working on the behavior of the dog, training helps with housebreaking your puppy. If you’ve ever tried to potty a puppy by yourself, you know it’s no mean feat. Training also covers socialization. The cost ranges from $900-$1200 for about 10 private lessons. If your puppy catches up fast, he won’t need all the lessons.

What to Expect From an Eskie

American Eskimo Dog price aside, what are some of the attributes of this canine? Well, we’ve already established that this is a beautiful dog. No doubt about that. When it comes to size, you can pick the toy (6-12 lbs.), miniature (10-17 lbs.), or the standard version (18-35 lbs.). The coat color is either white or white biscuit.

As for her temperament, expect an intelligent, protective, alert, energetic, friendly, and independent dog. She loves to play with kids and being affectionate around them. Despite being very energetic, she can be happy in an apartment as long as she is exercised sufficiently. Since he is eager to please, training her is easy. She can pick commands quickly. Sadly, her undercoat is dense while the outer features long hair meaning she’s a heavy shedder. Be sure to brush your baby several times a week to keep the coat matt-free and control shedding.

American Eskimo Dog Price: Final Thoughts

There it is – the American Eskimo Dog price alongside other useful information to know before getting one. These are approximate figures meant to give you an idea of how much to expect. All the best as you begin your journey of Eskie ownership.

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Sable M. is a canine chef, professional pet blogger, and proud owner of two male dogs. I have been an animal lover all my life, with dogs holding a special place in my heart. Initially, I created this blog to share recipes, tips, and any relevant information on healthy homemade dog treats. But because of my unrelenting passion to make a difference in the world of dogs, I have expanded the blog’s scope to include the best information and recommendations about everything dog lovers need to know about their canine friends’ health and wellbeing. My mission now is to find the most helpful content on anything related to dogs and share it with fellow hardworking hound lovers. While everything I share is in line with the latest evidence-based veterinarian health guidelines, nothing should be construed as veterinary advice. Please contact your vet in all matters regarding your Fido’s health.