Pros and Cons of Owning A Dachshund Terrier Mix

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The famously elongated bodies, short legs, and ever-alert, comical look of the dachshund has won millions of hearts across the globe. But while the physical appearance of a dachshund can put a smile on any dog lover’s face, there are many other dachshund mixes that might even be cuter. One dachshund mix that has become very popular in the recent past is the Dachshund Terrier Mix—a cross between purebred dachshund with a terrier.

People have fallen in love with this mix not only because they are cute but also due to the fact that they make great friends and are complete amusers. This is one dachshund mix that will never let you get bored as they are weird, funny, and entertaining.

But is dachshund terrier mix the right dog for you? To help you decide, let’s try and look at the top pros and cons of owning a dachshund terrier mix.

Before we look at the pros and cons of owning this amazing mix, it is important to note that since there are different types of dachshunds and terriers, there are many dachshund terrier mixes. The most common ones include:

  • Dachshund and Yorkshire terrier (Dorkie)
  • Dachshund and Jack Russel terrier (Jackshund)
  • Dachshund and Scottish Terrier (Doxie Scott)
  • Dachshund and Boston Terrier (Bodach)
  • Dachshund and Rat Terriers (Toy Rat Doxie)
  • Dachshund and Silky Terriers
  • Dachshund and Fox terries
  • Dachshund and White Terriers

Pros

1.They are cute and appealing

Dachshunds are famed for their short legs and long noses. But if you cross them with terriers, you get a cuter, short-legged, and wiry-haired ball of fuzz. In particular, expect the following features in a dachshund terrier mix:

  • Physical appearance: They are short and have elongated bodies lie their Dachshund parents
  • Body: Longer than purebred dachshunds
  • Ears: Maybe slopping like their dachshund parents or standing erect like their terrier parents.
  • Height: Reaches up to 11 inches
  • Weight: Up to 32 pounds
  • Size: They are not big dogs but their size will depend on particular terrier and dachshund parents.
  • Coat: May take wiry coat of their terrier parents or smooth coats of their dachshund parents. In terms of color, expect brown, tan, black, white or a blend of these colors.

2. Friendly and Playful

Since both dachshunds and terriers are friendly and loyal companions to their owners, expect dachshund terrier mix to be friendly and playful. They are, therefore, the best mix to keep if you are looking for a dog that can entertain you by performing a few tricks.

They tend to become attached to one owner though they remain friendly to the rest of the family. They are also natural pleasers, so if they learn a trick or find something that makes their owner happy or laugh, they will quickly learn to do it over and over. Due to this deep attachment, a dachshund terrier mix may suffer from separation anxiety if you leave him alone for too long.

Because both dachshunds and terriers tend to have an independent side, a dachshund terrier mix may be territorial and wary of strangers. When they meet strangers, they will take time to get to know about them before they can be comfortable around them. This territorial behavior can be extended to other dogs and pets as well, so ensure that you socialize them well or supervise them appropriately when you visit a dog park.

If you have children, you must worry about the behavior of a dog breed that you introduce to your household. But a dachshund terrier mix is a great breed for children, particularly if they are socialized early and when children are instructed to be gentle to them.

3. Energetic, Intelligent, and Fearless

Like their parents, dachshund terrier crosses are smart and vigilant, one of the reasons why they make fine watchdogs. They may also be used as therapy and service dogs because they are smart and affectionate.

Although they are not built for distance running, strenuous swimming, or leaping, this cross is very active, energetic, and always game for anything. If you want a dog that you can take for long walks, open space runs, hikes, and ball play, then dotson terrier mix will not disappoint you.

Despite their size, dachshund terrier crosses are very courageous. They will go after any vermin headstrong—they will even take animals that are bigger than them. Some mixes may also be aggressive to other pets and strangers. So, leash them when you are going to a park.    

4. Excellent Hunters

Both terriers and dachshunds have great hunting instincts. So, a dachshund terrier cross may inherit a strong prey drive, strong senses of smell, and tend to be curious in nature.

If you are a hunting enthusiast, therefore, you may consider owning this cross because, like their parents, they tend to stay focused and follow the trail without distraction.

However, this strong hunting instinct may sometimes prompt them to chase small animals and moving things. So, when they are not somewhere safe, consider keeping them leashed.

5. Are considerably low shedders

Like other breeds, dachshund terrier crosses shed naturally as a way to get rid of old hair and grow new ones. However, unlike other breeds, the crosses are not heavy shedders.

How much a dachshund terrier mix sheds will depend on the type of coat he has inherited from parents. Some crosses will be more low-shedding while others will be moderate shedders.

Fleas, allergies, mange, seborrhea, and hormonal imbalance are some other factors that may cause your dachshund terrier cross to shed more than normal. Some conditions like Cushing’s syndrome and hypothyroidism, which they may inherit from their dachshund parents, may also make your pup to shed more.

6. Can Be Your Companion For Long

Terriers tend to have longer life spans compared to other large breed dogs—the average lifespan of a terrier range between 10 and 20 years. When it comes to their crosses, the lifespan largely depends on the size of the other non-terrier parent. Canine experts claim that the best predictors of a terrier mix’s lifespan are size and weight with longevity increasing as the size goes down.

Based on this analogy, expect your terrier weiner dog mix to have a longer lifespan, especially if you take good care of him. Breeders say that the cross can live anywhere between 12 and 16 years. 

Cons

1.Prone to spinal cord issues

Since a dachshund terrier mix has a long spinal cord with significantly smaller rib cages, they may be prone to intervertebral disc disease (IVDD). Dogs that are affected by IVDD may suffer from incontinence, lameness, and even paralysis.  So, don’t allow your mix to jump up on high surfaces such as furniture, steps, and stairs because he could injure his spine. If possible, buy your mix a nice comfy bed with dog-friendly stairs for easy access to the floor. 

Since Terries tend to be prone to eye problems, your dachshund terrier cross may suffer from eye issues like dry eye, cataracts, lens luxation, and glaucoma.

And like other dogs with drooping ears, if your dachshund terrier mix has dropped ears, he may suffer ear infections, particularly if you don’t help him keep them clean.

2. They tend to be more vocal

Even though dachshund terrier crosses are petite, they may have a very strong voice. In particular, they have high-pitched, short barks that can sometimes be persistent. You should be prepared to control this barking behavior because it can be a concern to your neighbors if you are living in an apartment or in urban settings.

Here is a good illustration of how your dachshund terrier mix will cry and bark when left alone:

3. They love Digging

Like their dachshund parents, dachshund terrier mix love to dig. So, if you decide to keep these cute little crosses, beware that they can damage your lawn, dig your furniture, destroy your flower bed, or even escape by digging under your fence.

It can be difficult to control this instinctive behavior but you can redirect it using suitable dog toys that cater to such instincts. The best option in the market now is iDig from iFetch, which is specially designed to cater to your dog’s digging behavior.

Tips for Raising a Dachshund Terrier Mix

  • Don’t allow your terrier weiner dog mix to be overweight to avoid strain on his back, which can lead to IVDD. Don’t fall for his pleading eyes and stick to the recommended quantity of food.
  • To ensure that your mix behaves well around other pets, strangers, in the park, or in your house, you should begin training and socializing him right from puppyhood.
  • Don’t assume that because your mix is small, he doesn’t need more exercise than running around the house. A Dotson terrier mix needs regular exercise to keep him fit and builds stronger muscles to support his long body. However, don’t allow your cross to run up and down high surfaces to avoid injury.
  • Invest in regular grooming to keep the coat of your mix healthy and shiny. You should also bath him when he is smelly or grubby.
  • Like other breeds, your mix needs to have his teeth brushed regularly to avoid dental issues. His ears should also be wiped and cleaned once a week and nails carefully clipped when they grow long.
  • Take your dachshund terrier mix to a dog park once in a while to allow him to socialize and play. Playing with him some games of fetch is highly recommended.
  • Because of his independent nature, training a dachshund terrier mix can be gradual. So, be patient and consistent with your training. Besides, only use positive training techniques like rewards, praise, encouragement, and use of treats as opposed to punishment or scolding. 

Final Thoughts

When given the right care, a dachshund terrier mix can make a wonderful pet. Usually energetic, alert and active, the cross is suited for people who love to relax but are somehow active.

Like any other mutt, your dachshund terrier mix may inherit some of the above-highlighted traits from either parent, so there is no guarantee that what we have mentioned here is cast in stone.

Before buying a dachshund terrier mix puppy, therefore, do your homework on the parents and ask for health test results before you meet their litter. This is the best way to figure out the personality of your dachshund terrier mix.