How to Build an Outdoor Dog Potty Area on Concrete

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How to Build an Outdoor Dog Potty Area on Concrete

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Having a dog is blissful but challenging at the same time. Perhaps the greatest challenge is training him to pee and poo in the right spot.

If you have grass, chances are it has countless yellow spots on them. Cleaning urine and poo from concrete is not fun either.

Enter the magic solution that will keep everyone happy: an outdoor potty training area on concrete.

Not only does it keep your house smelling fresh but it also makes it easy to manage the cleanliness around your home.

Plus, it can be built on an apartment balcony or a tiny deck.

So how can you build one? What tools do you need?

Well, we will give you that entire scoop right here.

Requirements

Before roll up your sleeves, you will need a few essentials from your hardware store or landscaping store/center.

A. Cinder Blocks

You want to create a demarcation between the outdoor patio and the rest of your property.

Cinder blocks are weatherproof, sturdy, and look great.

You can throw some decorations of your own to take things a notch higher.

Choose the shape, color, and weight that appeal to you the most and make the order.

The concrete should be high enough to accommodate the height of the grass grown on the potty.

B. Weed Inhibitor

This is a plastic lining that is placed on the concrete before adding the soil.

Order enough to go over the entire potty and some more for the grass bed.

ECOgardener Pro Garden Weed Barrier is an excellent choice due to its sturdy design, durability, and ability to prevent weed growth without blocking air or water.

C. Soil

Since you will be planting grass on the potty, you need soil that is rich in nutrients especially phosphorous, nitrogen, and potash.

D. Sod

If you have a pre-existing grass lawn, you are in luck. Simply dig out enough to cover the area.

Else, make an order from your local landscaping center or commercial garden.

E. A structure for the dog to aim at

This is optional but if you want to entice your fur baby to do her business in the outdoor potty, a structure of some sort always does the trick.

A fire hydrant or rock is easy to aim at. This will certainly cut down the training by a considerable amount. It may also help to reduce accidents.

We have a post on the best fire hydrant options that you can get for your pooch. Check it here: 8 Best Fire Hydrant For Dogs To Pee On.

F. Roller

This will come in handy after the sod has been laid out.

Order one from the nearest home improvement store or Amazon.

If you can’t get your hands on one, rest easy. We will tell you what to do down below.

Procedure

Once you have all the above items, you can proceed to build the potty. This is the procedure to follow.

1.Create the Perimeter

Your first job is to block the potty from everything else.

There’s no right way of doing this. Simply lay the cinder blocks along the perimeter of the area.

To maintain a straight line, you might want to put a string to good use. If you don’t mind cleaning up, you can draw a line using paint or chalk.

Also, it helps to create some kind of a slope to ensure that any water drains in one place. Failure to do this means you will have pools around the potty. This is neither good for aesthetics nor cleaning.

You are lucky if your area already has a slope to it. If not, throw in a few edges to raise the level on one side.

If you don’t have cinder blocks, you can construct a wooden box—like in the above second picture.

2. Apply the Weed Inhibitor

The next step is to create a barrier between the concrete and the grass. This is why you got the weed inhibitor in the first place. It is what will keep the moisture out and the dirt in.

Line it up all over the place loosely so that it can be able to bear the weight of the fertilizer and grass without tearing apart.

Once the lining has covered the entire area, secure it using the block tops and get rid of the excess.

3. Add the soil

After the lining is well laid, go ahead and pour the soil over it.

Again, there’s no formula for doing this. Just throw it in there leaving a few inches of space at the top for the grass. This keeps everything contained in the potty.

After placing the soil, grab your watering can, hose pipe or any tool that will introduce moisture in the area.

A little moisture is just enough. Resist the temptation to completely saturate the soil.

4. Roll Out the Sod

This is where things get interesting. Lay down the sods, one by one, over the soil.

The trick here is to pack them tightly but not to stack them on each other.

When you overlap the grass, the ones on top will not take root, ultimately ruining your efforts.

Once the sod is laid out, proceed to roll it out using a roller. This is what helps the soil and the sod marry and create a bright green space.

Use a rolling pin to roll the grass out if you don’t have a roller. Your body weight can also step in and save the day.

5. Water the Grass

The hard work is over at this point. All that remains is to show some love to the sod by spraying it down.

Water it to a point that the soil is moist. Repeat this process over the course of the next week or until you are sure that the sod has actually taken root. 

If you are satisfied, cut the grass, place the structure in the middle and invite your furry friend to explore her new space.

For more details on how to build an outdoor dog potty area on concrete, check this video by Oodle Life:

Other Alternatives to Grass

Grass is a fantastic material to use for an outdoor potty. It is effective and natural. If well maintained, it can last for ages.

Unfortunately, it can also be quite expensive and high-maintenance. If it is not well kept, it can die quite fast.

Luckily there are a few other alternatives you can consider:

  • Artificial Grass: The advantage of using artificial grass is that it is a permanent, cost-effective, and convenient option. If you can fool your dog into using the potty, you’ll have hit a jackpot.
  • Cedar Mulch: This is actually popular among many dog owners looking for a temporary solution. Like artificial grass, cedar mulch is cheap. It also looks lovely and natural. Simply find a way to contain the mulch for better maintenance. You will need to replace this annually to keep the area clean and fresh.

Final Tips

There are a few things to keep in mind when building an outdoor dog potty on concrete.

  • First, the yellowing of grass will be a recurrent phenomenon. It is, therefore, recommended to have grass seed on hand to cover the areas when needed.
  • Secondly, you will need a drainage solution. This can be anything from a plastic storage bin with holes to a wooden option that complements your home’s décor.

Parting Thoughts

An outdoor dog potty is a great solution for training a pet to use the bathroom.

But if your backyard is all-concrete, it can be hard to keep up with your pup’s bathroom manners.

Lucky for you, you can create a little paradise for him with grass and a fire hydrant (as we’ve discussed above).

Take time to train her to use it and live peacefully ever after.

Image sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

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Sable M. is a canine chef, professional pet blogger, and proud owner of two male dogs. I have been an animal lover all my life, with dogs holding a special place in my heart. Initially, I created this blog to share recipes, tips, and any relevant information on healthy homemade dog treats. But because of my unrelenting passion to make a difference in the world of dogs, I have expanded the blog’s scope to include the best information and recommendations about everything dog lovers need to know about their canine friends’ health and wellbeing. My mission now is to find the most helpful content on anything related to dogs and share it with fellow hardworking hound lovers. While everything I share is in line with the latest evidence-based veterinarian health guidelines, nothing should be construed as veterinary advice. Please contact your vet in all matters regarding your Fido’s health.